Leadership/Management, Sales/Sales Management, Team Member Engagement

5 Tips For Leading Change Without Authority

by Caug124

June 16th, 2010
3
Comments

During periods of change, we sometimes think too far ahead. If we allow ourselves to get caught up in “what if” thoughts, we lose track of today. Take on the changes one day at a time, and the process seems less overwhelming.

Create a worst-case scenario. We haven’t truly faced head-on until we have faced the worst-case scenario. Always ask yourself, what is the worst that could happen for me as a result of this change? Consider how the change might push you beyond your capabilities, might create negative consequences with managers and team members, and how it might drain your energy and productiveness.

Prepare to accept it. This isn’t a matter of saying to ourselves that if it happens, it happens. It means thorough planning for the worst-case scenario. It’s the same sort of planning that emergency responders conduct. Maybe there won’t be a disaster that requires that level of preparation, but if it happens, they are ready. Plan to improve on a situation to avoid a worst-case scenario; we must be willing to throw our energy and resources into the effort. Consider all the possible ways that the worst outcome can be avoided. In the planning process, consider communication, marshalling team effort, and intervening preemptively.

Keep busy. Sometimes change has the effect of slowing us down, leaving us disorganized and unmotivated. It is during these periods in our careers that we need to summon the most energy possible and keep busy. Not only will this keep us from dwelling on our concerns, but it will also enhance our image in the organization at a critical time.

Cooperate with the inevitable. We can’t avoid or deflect change. It’s a part of everything we do in our careers. When we remind ourselves of this, we don’t waste time and attitude fighting inevitable change.

Do the very best you can. The most fundamental rule of business professionalism is to do the very best we can at all times. This motivates us internally, driving our efforts through whatever changes we are facing. Whatever way the change ends up impacting our careers, we want to be able to say to others and to ourselves that we did our very best. Put enthusiasm into your work. What are the ways that we can boost our enthusiasm about our work? How do you get motivated? What can you do to make sure that you are giving the most energy to your work that you can? During periods of change we need as much enthusiasm as we can muster. When we are enthusiastic, we get more done better, faster, and with less. We experience more enjoyment and feel a sense of accomplishment from our work.

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  1. Guy Farmer /

    As leaders we can deal more effectively with change if we view it as an opportunity rather than a negative. Even the most difficult challenges can be dealt with in a manner that does not increase anxiety or worsen the situation. It helps to keep a calm head and simply take the time to assess what the situation is, brainstorm possible solutions, decide what you want to do and by when.

  2. Richard Reid /

    I fully resonate with your point regarding Co-operate with the inevitable. Change is going to happen, it is happening. Similar to martial arts if you move with the change you can adapt and move to a new place with new opportunities versus experiencing the stress, disappointments and failures that result from resisting change.
    One of the biggest barriers to successfully dealing with change is not letting go of the past or trying to hang onto things the the way they used to be.

  3. Richard J. /

    It is better to be moving in the direction of the change than to sit stagnant. As the comment from Richard Reid noted above – Change is inevitable. That said, I’m a big believer that energy flows where attention goes. Focused change is the art of channeling energy into your actions. Change is growth. Change is the only constant in life. Embrace it!